Mark Bao

An insanely great documentary about the creative process:

This film is about drive. It’s about the passion and creative drive of Kazunori Yamauchi, the architect behind Gran Turismo’s birth and breath-taking fifteen-year evolution. This film will trace his relentless willingness to challenge himself, to hold none of his past achievements sacred, and push beyond the virtual divide in his pursuit of perfection. Through the support of PlayStation, Kaz’s journey has forever changed the gaming and automotive landscape and in doing so, has redefined how we perceive the relationship between art, entertainment and culture.

KAZ: Pushing The Virtual Divide - Gran Turismo Documentary

“We are moving from a world where computing power was scarce to a place where it now is almost limitless, and where the true scarce commodity is increasingly human attention.”

—   Satya Nadella

(Source: microsoft.com)

“We all make decisions for emotional or intuitive reasons instead of rational ones. Some of us admit that. Some of us think using our emotions is better than being rational all the time. Some of us don’t.”

—   Apenwarr — The Curse of Smart People
Humans of New York:

"I’ve been trying to get into a full time orchestra for the past 20 years. I’d guess I’ve been to over 200 auditions. It can be pretty heartbreaking. I tried out for the New York Philharmonic four times. One time I prepared three months for the Los Angeles Philharmonic audition, flew all the way across the country, and they cut me off after twelve seconds. But believe or not, I still have a certain amount of optimism about the process. And I think I’m getting better."

A good reminder of how difficult things are.

Humans of New York:

"I’ve been trying to get into a full time orchestra for the past 20 years. I’d guess I’ve been to over 200 auditions. It can be pretty heartbreaking. I tried out for the New York Philharmonic four times. One time I prepared three months for the Los Angeles Philharmonic audition, flew all the way across the country, and they cut me off after twelve seconds. But believe or not, I still have a certain amount of optimism about the process. And I think I’m getting better."

A good reminder of how difficult things are.

natgeofound:

Pedestrians walk on bustling Dotombori Street in Osaka, Japan, March 1970.Photograph by Thomas J. Abercrombie, National Geographic Creative

Beautiful.

natgeofound:

Pedestrians walk on bustling Dotombori Street in Osaka, Japan, March 1970.Photograph by Thomas J. Abercrombie, National Geographic Creative

Beautiful.

We certainly have a way of treating life like it’s a dress rehearsal. A serious bucket list, if nothing else, reminds you that the curtain’s already up and if you want things to happen that aren’t happening, you need to be making them happen now, or getting ready to make them happen…

Checking all your list items off isn’t nearly as important as becoming a person for whom these goals are possible. It’s not a list of needs. Nobody needs to see the Taj Mahal or run a marathon to be happy. But it might be true that making extraordinary things happen is a habit that lends itself to happiness.

—   David Cain on making your bucket list a serious one, evolving with you, one that drives what you actually do.

Sprachgefühl

The intuitive feeling of a speaker for the essential character of a language; linguistic instinct. OED

“Don’t give people 24 white pills. If you want them to finish their antibiotics, don’t give them 24 white pills. Give them 18 white pills and six blue ones and say, “When you finish the white pills, take the blue ones.” The pills can, frankly, be identical, okay? People will simply be more likely to finish a course of treatment if it comes in two sequential colors. Fact. That’s the mental equivalent of cars having steering wheels, not nose steering. It’s just the way our brains work. Whether it’s notionally rational or not is irrelevant.”

—   

Rory Sutherland — This Thing For Which We Have No Name

The irrelevance of rationality. Interesting.

Then there will be the rare event that sweeps like a rogue wave over my life and practice. After X happened what I noticed when I sat down to write was feeling raw. It was like trying to describe a Jackson Pollock to someone who’s never seen a Jackson Pollock. Where do I start. I could name colors, talk about paint splatters, I could use metaphor but unless they’d stood face to face with one it would only go so far. And as I described this painting, my memory of the original seeing would itself change. It would become my description. Time corrodes and words are a poor restoration job; they make parts of the painting brighter and sharper than the original.

Is it possible to preserve anything?

When I sat down after X, I felt the rawness of emotions not yet corrupted by words. Something had ruptured and with each sentence I was turning the heavy crank of the machinery that would once again seal the dam. I was finding meaning, which would become theory, which would then be applied to future situations and lead to the same misunderstandings that got me here in the first place. This realization made me incredibly sad, and hopeful.

—   #54 X

“My trouble with the phrase “everything happens for a reason” is that it gets the order wrong. Things don’t happen for reasons; reasons are the stories we graft on ex post facto to keep from being overwhelmed by the senselessness of life. A more accurate bumper sticker would read: Everything happens.”

—   Everything Happens — Jack Cheng